Na Příkopě Street, or “On the Moat,” is one of Prague’s most iconic streets. It was built on top of the moat that lined the Old Town Walls and now connects the old and new parts of the city (Wenceslas Square and Republic Square). Located in the center of Prague, it is home to many historic buildings and is considered “The Financial Heart of Prague.” 

It’s also one of the city’s best shopping streets, being a pedestrian-only street that’s lined with shops, fast food chains, boutiques, banks, tourist cafes, and the only multiplex in the city. You’ll find new modern buildings alongside imposing baroque structures that reflect the street’s history.

When you’re in Prague, get ready to experience the old and the new, and don’t miss out on the unique sights and experiences this lively street has to offer. 

Location & How to Get There

Na Příkopě Street is located at Na Příkopě 110 00, Nove Mesto, Prague, and is accessible via several options.

If you’re starting from Prague Airport and want to go directly to Na Příkopě, you can go there via bus, taxi, or bus and subway.

  • If you’re going by bus, take the 907 bus from the airport. The ride usually takes around 45 minutes and arrives at Náměstí Republiky.
  • A taxi, the faster albeit more expensive option, would take around 20 minutes.
  • One of the best options to get to there is by taking the bus and subway. Go to Terminal 1 and get on the 119 or 322 bus. Get off the bus at Nádraží Veleslavín (Veleslavin Station) at the Prague Metro. Then, take the Purple A line or Green A line going to Mustek-A. From there, it’s only a four-minute walk to Na Příkopě. 

What to Do 

Join a Walking Tour

A walking tour is one of the best ways to learn more about a city’s history and lore and to see the city at a comfortable pace. When in Prague, you’ll find a lot of options for walking tours that let you explore some of the best sights of the city. 

One of the itineraries for such tours is Na Příkopě Street, which is also known for its expensive real estate. If you want to see the city and its sights in a more unique way, you can also opt to join a night tour and watch how the city and Na Příkopě transform.

Visit Wenceslas Square (Václavské náměstí)

Wenceslas Square is considered the city’s commercial and administrative center. Originally called the “Horse Market” as it was originally intended for trading horses, the Square has since seen progress, starting with the first horse-pulled tram that was introduced in 1884.

It stood as a witness to many historical events, such as a demonstration for voting rights in 1905 and a number of large gatherings in 1989 that led to the cessation of the Communist regime in the country.

Today, it is one of the most iconic sites, featuring a bronze statue of its namesake, St. Wenceslas, and the National Museum.

Drop by The Museum of Communism

Visit the Museum of Communism and learn more about the country’s history and its ties with communism. The exhibition has a chronological layout and offers a complete look at the rise and fall of communism in the country. You’ll also get a glimpse of what life was like under the Soviet system. 

Watch a Movie at Cinema City

Don’t miss out on the latest movie releases! Cinema City Slovansky dum is the city’s only multiplex. It houses 10 cinema halls, all of which are digital, with eight of them being able to project 3D movies. It has an upper floor, with three of the biggest halls, and a lower floor with seven halls. 

Do Some Shopping

What would a shopping district be without some shopping? Some shopping malls can be a bit difficult to find, though, as they don’t look like your typical malls. The shops are incorporated into the buildings, giving them a unique look. 

You’ll find shopping malls like the Shopping Centre Myslbek at Na Příkopě 19-21, Cerna Ruz at Prikope 12, and Slovansky dum at Na Příkopě 22. 

Shop to your heart’s content at international retail chains like Zara, Calvin Klein, and Armani, or go for something more unique with shops that sell Bohemian crystal, like Moser at Na Příkopě 12. If you love shoes, then you’ll be delighted by shops like Salamander at Na Příkopě 16 and Deichmann at Na Příkopě 9-11 that sell their own label, along with other international brands. 

Visit Nearby Tourist Attractions

Na Příkopě is flanked by numerous attractions located in the Old City and the New City. 

If you’re not pressed for time, you can visit some of these select destinations that will awe anyone, from art lovers to those who appreciate fresh produce:

  • The Mucha Museum in the New City
  • House of the Black Madonna in the Old City
  • Prague Fruit Market (Ovocný Trh) which is located in the Old City
  • Theater of States and Carolinum, also in the Old City

Dine at Na Příkopě Restaurants

Experience international and local fare right at the heart of Prague. Na Příkopě is home to cozy cafes, fine dining restaurants, bars, and authentic international food, from Japanese and Chinese to Italian and Middle Eastern. The street also has its fair share of American-style joints that serve burgers, wings, and onion rings. 

If you’re looking for a place with great architecture and good food, you might want to drop by Kavarna Obecni dum. 

What to See

Na Příkopě is a shopping street that will delight you with one surprise after another. Here are some sights to see on this iconic street:

The Buildings

The buildings that house many of the establishments in Na Příkopě are works of art themselves. 

Many of these structures feature Art Noveau and Baroque styles. When doing your shopping, don’t forget to look up at the buildings’ beautiful façade. 

If you appreciate walking or shopping without a huge volume of crowds, you’ll like the less crowded stores on this street. 

Czech National Bank

Who would’ve thought that a bank would be one of the must-see locations in Prague? The Czech National Bank is definitely a sight to see, with its imposing Cubist and Art Deco façade. The building is accentuated with a sculpture created by Antonin Popp called “Genius and the Lion.”

The Statue of St. Wenceslas

Head on over to Wenceslas Square to see one of Prague’s most famous statues. Made by Josef Vaclav Myslbek, this bronze statue features St. Wenceslas on horseback and was unveiled in 1913. Throughout the years, statues of other saints were added to the original, making it part of a sculptural group. 

Old Town Square (Staroměstské náměstí)

Founded in the 12th century, the Old Town Square is considered part of historical Prague and is the city’s oldest square. You’ll find several important buildings in the square, like the Blue Goose House (No. 25) and Ox House (No. 27).

Charles Bridge

A UNESCO World Heritage site, the Charles Bridge is a medieval stone bridge that connects the Old Town and the Lesser Town. It was finished in the 15th century and was built as a replacement for the Old Judith Bridge. Here, you’ll see 30 Baroque statues that line both sides of the bridge. It is believed that touching one of the statues, that of St. John of Nepomuk, will bring you good luck. 

The History of Na Příkopě Street

Considered one of the most expensive streets among the V4, Na Příkopě Street has a long history.

It was built on the moat that divided the Old Town and the New Town that was founded in 1348. With the inception of the New Town, the Old Town slowly became deserted, leading to the moat on which the street was built to be covered up. 

Continuous developments throughout the years allowed the area around the moat to be leveled, transforming into a street that now connects the Old and New parts of the city. 

By the 18th century, Na Příkopě was used as a promenade and was considered to be one of Prague’s most fashionable areas. The empty lots in the Old Town were developed and turned into Neoclassical structures, some of which can still be seen today.

With the advent of more modern technology, the street as continuously transformed with the introduction of gas lighting and electric trams. The area also had its fair share of German cafes and was considered a center for German minority in the city’s center. 

With the clearance of the Jewish ghetto, Jewish merchants moved to Na Příkopě. This influx of Jewish businessmen to the area cemented what would be the street’s reputation for commerce. Today, it has retained its historic and commercial history and stands as one of the best shopping streets in Prague.